Answeriing Stackoverflow questions provides a great feedback for finding out gaps in the official documentation of my favourite opensource tools. One of the questions which I answered here was how to change Payara Server master password in docker container. Obviously, in a standard server installation, this is simple – just use the  asadmin change-master-password  command, then type the old and new password in to the console and it’s done. Not in docker though, where the configuration has to be automated by a script. The same applies to all infrastructure-as-a-code solutions like Chef or Puppet. So I had to dig deeper into the documentation and experiment a bit. (more…)

As a Java EE developer, I sometimes envy how fast it’s possible to see the result of a code change in a running application with interpreted languages like PHP or JavaScript. With Java, it’s always necessary to rebuild the source code in a bytecode, which can be then safely updated only by restarting the whole application. And all developers know that restoring the desired state of the application after a fresh restart takes time and is tedious.

Many developers know that JRebel can help a lot with updating the code on the fly. There’s been a lot of effort put into it to support all sorts of code and resource changes and refresh them with virtually any Java framework used by the application. But the downside is that it’s pretty expensive for a casual developer, doing just some hacking on his/her own or working on a non-commercial project. I have some experience with JRebel and I liked it a lot, but I was using it on a commercial project where I didn’t pay for the license. A while ago I’ve come across an opensource alternative called HotswapAgent, which has worked very well for me for my personal Java EE projects. I’m going to write up how I got it running in my IDE and my Java EE server of choice – Payara Server. (more…)

In June, I had a public presentation at a Java User Group in Prague. It was the first time I gave my new talk about building reactive applications with Java EE. And as a bonus, I wanted to introduce Payara project and how it relates to the GlassFish project. (more…)

In March, I’ve started working for Payara and I’ve definitely enjoyed it since then. It’s been very refreshing. I really love all the new experience, including

  • the startup-like company culture (have a look at the courageous company web site)
  • being part of the Payara open-source project and community
  • helping customers directly instead of programming in an IT department several layers below
  • writing technical blogs and cooperating with our innovative marketing department
  • being the face of the Payara project and evangelist in Java EE community
  • and all this working remotely from home

I could write several posts about all this new experience. Hopefully another time. But now, I will just share the blog posts and screen casts about Payara Server features that I’ve authored and co-authored. (more…)

Recently I made a small shift in my career, exchanging series of jobs and projects as a Java developer for a job to support and promote a great open-source product – Payara server. I made a leap from a developer who just enjoys the quality of lots of open-source software, to become a voice and face of one such product, for the community on github as well as for customers willing to pay for the support. I love that I may become active part of the Java and Java EE community, actively participate in shaping it, present new ideas and possibilities, and last but not least, help to modernize, support and shape the future of GlassFish server extended by the Payara server project. (more…)

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